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Kenya

Nairobi National Park

PLAN MY TRIP

On the outskirts of Nairobi’s central business district lies the wide-open grass plains and acacia bush of Nairobi National Park, a game-rich retreat.

Established in 1946, Nairobi National Park is the first national park in Kenya and it encompasses 28,963 acres of land. It is only four miles south of the heart of the city with an electric fence separating the animals from the busy metropolis. In fact, Nairobi’s skyscrapers can be seen gracing the skyline behind the park making for some amazing photographs since it is the only natural safari park that has a cityscape background. On its southern border, the park is bound by the Mbagathi River which is unfenced and open to the Kitengela Conservation Area. The park has a wide range of habitats though it is predominately made up of open grass plains but also includes riverine forest, highland dry forests, and deep rocky valleys and gorges.

The park has a wide variety of animals found within its borders including one hundred mammal species. Some of the wildlife found here include Cape buffaloes, baboons, black rhinos, gazelles, cheetah, hartebeest, leopards, Masai lions, elands, impala, giraffes, waterbucks, and many more. Grazing animals including wildebeest and zebras use the Kitengela Conservation area to migrate through to the Athi-Kapiti plains.

The best time to view the abundant wildlife here is during the dry season when all other water sources have dried up. There are a multitude of bird species who live and pass through the region with up to 500 permanent and migratory species. The dams have attracted many birds, especially waterfowl to the area. The David Sheldrick Trust operates a sanctuary in the park for orphan elephants and rhino calves. These baby animals are hand-reared and then released into secure sanctuaries.

Nairobi National Park is a big tourist draw for the city of Nairobi. In July and August, visitors come to watch the wildebeest and zebra migration. The Park’s Wildlife Conservation Education Center hosts lectures and videos about the resident animals as well as guided tours of the park grounds and orphanage. However, game drives are the best way to explore the park. But there are also many walking trails and five designated picnic spots. Bird watching is a popular pastime with so many species to view. Bush dinners are a delicious way to obverse the abundant wildlife while enjoying a great meal.

1 of 8
2 of 8
3 of 8
4 of 8
5 of 8
6 of 8
7 of 8
8 of 8

Kenya

Nairobi National Park

PLAN MY TRIP

On the outskirts of Nairobi’s central business district lies the wide-open grass plains and acacia bush of Nairobi National Park, a game-rich retreat.

Established in 1946, Nairobi National Park is the first national park in Kenya and it encompasses 28,963 acres of land. It is only four miles south of the heart of the city with an electric fence separating the animals from the busy metropolis. In fact, Nairobi’s skyscrapers can be seen gracing the skyline behind the park making for some amazing photographs since it is the only natural safari park that has a cityscape background. On its southern border, the park is bound by the Mbagathi River which is unfenced and open to the Kitengela Conservation Area. The park has a wide range of habitats though it is predominately made up of open grass plains but also includes riverine forest, highland dry forests, and deep rocky valleys and gorges.

The park has a wide variety of animals found within its borders including one hundred mammal species. Some of the wildlife found here include Cape buffaloes, baboons, black rhinos, gazelles, cheetah, hartebeest, leopards, Masai lions, elands, impala, giraffes, waterbucks, and many more. Grazing animals including wildebeest and zebras use the Kitengela Conservation area to migrate through to the Athi-Kapiti plains.

The best time to view the abundant wildlife here is during the dry season when all other water sources have dried up. There are a multitude of bird species who live and pass through the region with up to 500 permanent and migratory species. The dams have attracted many birds, especially waterfowl to the area. The David Sheldrick Trust operates a sanctuary in the park for orphan elephants and rhino calves. These baby animals are hand-reared and then released into secure sanctuaries.

Nairobi National Park is a big tourist draw for the city of Nairobi. In July and August, visitors come to watch the wildebeest and zebra migration. The Park’s Wildlife Conservation Education Center hosts lectures and videos about the resident animals as well as guided tours of the park grounds and orphanage. However, game drives are the best way to explore the park. But there are also many walking trails and five designated picnic spots. Bird watching is a popular pastime with so many species to view. Bush dinners are a delicious way to obverse the abundant wildlife while enjoying a great meal.